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WIP to FO Challenge- 19 for 2019

It seems like everywhere you look online these days, people are taking stock of 2018 and setting goals for moving forward.  The first few days of the new year tend to be all about making resolutions, and to that end- here’s one of mine:

I resolve to turn the following 19 wips (works in progress) into FOs (finished objects) before the end of 2019.

I’ll write at length about each project when I finish (and post) about them, but for now here’s a short blurb for each:

1. FO Project Jars

wip yearly fo jars

I need to rip out all the individual lengths of yarn (1-10 yards long, each), match them up with what project they were from, and put the separated yarn into jars designated for each year.

2. Harvest Moon Pullover – crochetwip crochet harvest moon

I started this sweater on November 25 2016 as a way to use my adored Noro Silk Garden limited stash on something for myself.  Limited yarn + crocheted pattern with big holes = a sweater that might fit… right?

3. Granny Rectangle Blanket – crochetwip granny rectangle blanket

I started this blanket on August 9 2015 as a way to use up random sock yarns I figured I’d never get around to using for, y’know, socks.  Figured out how to make granny squares as rectangles and then alternated with white for… some reason.

4. & 5. Ralph and Black Sheep’s Sweaters – sewing & cross stitchwip boys toys sweaters

I started these sweaters for the boys’ favorite stuffed animals a few nights before Christmas 2016.  They were intended to be little surprises for them but instead they’ve sat in a bag ever since.  Sadly Jakob is no longer as into iHasCupQuake as he used to be, so I’ll need to rip out the stitching on the front of Ralph’s sweater and hope it doesn’t leave gaping holes in the fleece.  Then I’ll have to figure out new designs to personalize the fronts, find where I put the sleeve pieces, and sew the little sweaters together.

6. Drops V-Neck Pullover – knittingwip drops knit vneck

I started this deep-v sweater somewhere in 2015 or 2016.  It’s slouchy and soft and I want to wear it already.

7. Fluffy Shawl – knittingwip fluffy shawl

I started this shawl on April 6 2015.  It’s been sitting untouched in a bag since roughly that Fall.  I love how the colors blend together (black Sandes Garn Sisu and purple/green Noro Kureyon Sock) and would like it to be done and hugging my shoulders.

8. Comfy Socks – knittingwip fluffy ankleless socks

According to myself, I started these socks 2 FULL YEARS AGO.  They’re supposed to be my ‘take along’ knitting but because I haven’t finished designing the pattern, I never take them with me to work on.  I need them done so I can reclaim the needles and portable hanging knitting bag and start being more productive again.

9. Fun Fur Vest – knittingwip fun fur vest

I started this Bergere de France vest in 2012(!!).  My Ravelry projects page has it listed as completed on Feb 10 2015 but clearly it isn’t.  No ends are woven in, it might need armhole cuffs, and I think I was debating overdying the entire thing black.

10. Doodle Fusion Marco Raffiné Page – colorinwip doodle fusion marco raffine

This page from Doodle Fusion was started last summer (I think) using only my set of Marco Raffiné oil-based colored pencils.

11. Grimm Fairy Tales Alice Page – coloringwip grimm alice in wonderland

This page from Grimm’s Fairy Tales was a test to see if I could get good results using dollar store colored pencils.  I’ve since moved the pencils somewhere else and want to finish the image so I don’t need to dig them out any more.

12. Grimm Fairy Tales Little Red Page – coloringwip grimm little red riding hood

Those of you who follow me on Instagram would have seen this page from Grimm’s Fairy Tales back when I started it in June.  I love how it’s turning out and want to see how well I can complete it.

13. Imagimorphia Eagle 2-Page – coloringwip imagimorphia eagle

This double-page spread from Imagimorphia was started in the Fall of 2016.  I loved coloring the tiny rainbows and then lost steam.

14. Imagimorphia Egypt Page – coloringwip imagimorphia egypt

I honestly don’t remember when I started this page.  Luckily I’d blogged about it!

15. The Time Garden Quilt Page – coloringwip time garden pattern page

I don’t recall when I started working on this page in Daria Song’s The Time Garden either but judging from other posts about it I’d made in April 2016, I’m going to guess it was about that time.  I have NO idea, however, why I stopped it so close to being done.

16. The Princess Bride Fred Savage 2-Page – coloringwip princess bride fred savage

This page was blogged when I first started it, way back in March 2017.  I don’t want to move on to another page in the book until this one is done, though, so I need to make the time to finally get it finished up.

17. & 18. & 19. Harley Quinn, Betty Cooper & Teela Wall Hanging Trio – plastic canvas

wip plastic canvas girls trio

I’ve never shown these before, except for the odd glimpse in the background of Instagram pics.  I started this trio of plastic canvas portraits when I moved in August 2017.  While I love how they look in black and white (and blue), I designed them to be in full color and I’d love to see them complete.

Think I can do it?  Want to play along? Use the tag #19WIPtoFO2019 so I can see how many you get through!

ps: As I’m about to post this I just realized that 19 projects means committing to completing more than one per month.  Months that are already pretty busy with Becket, work, kids, commissions and all the new projects I want to work on and might come up over the year… Wish me luck- I’m gonna need it!!


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Can Marco Raffiné colored pencils be used as watercolors?

Can Marco Raffiné colored pencils be used as watercolors?

Yes.

No.

Maybe?

When I was playing around with my Caran D’Ache Neocolor II watercolor crayons I had my Raffinés next to me, as I’d just been working on the Egypt picture in the same imagimorphia coloring book.  I’d done a lot of research on them before purchasing, and one thing that had come up in people’s comments were how some of them had been able to use them as watercolors, though not everyone had that luck.  The Raffinés are oil-based colored pencils, not wax-based like Crayola and Prismacolor and most others, so they do color and shade and grip the tooth of the paper in a different way, but were they really so different that they could dissolve in water enough to be used as paint?

Let’s find out.

This is the page in the back of the book right before the hidden objects are pointed out.  I colored a bit of it with the pencils then used the same small brush and water pot as I used for the Neocolor IIs.

marco raffine 01

Here’s a before-and-after closeup of the lower section of the page.marco raffine 02

The top image is the dry coloring, and the lower image is after I’d applied water.  At first I was happily startled to see that it did appear to work!  I had to double check the ‘before’ pic on my phone to be sure, but seeing them side by side it’s hard to deny that there’s a clear difference between the two.  The light pencil strokes in the worm (?) have blended outwards, as well as in the pink flower on the left and the green leaf in the background.  The orange puff ball looks exactly like a watercolor had painted it, and even the browns in the fox (?) and mushroom are more evened and fluid.

marco raffine 02 back

I immediately checked the back of the page even though I wasn’t really concerned with bleed-through, but sure-enough there was none.

So if I think it sort of worked, why am I hesitant to say that outright?  Because while the colors did wetten and spread, once dried the strokes were still visible and retained the soft look of the oil-based pencils.  It’s hard to explain but it sort of looks like I’d done a light wash of watercolors over or under the pencils, as they’re both visible.

Since it was hard to compare the ‘after’ with the small image on my phone, I decided to do a definitive comparison test in the book itself.

The first image below (top left) is my initial coloring of the royal penguin on a skateboard.  I drew a line down the center to keep the division clear and then colored both sides with the Raffinés.  Then I wetted the left side only.  Did the pigment become a wash of color? Yes… there is a visible difference in the two sides, with the left side looking more even and ‘full’.  But I still wanted to see a bit more.

In the top right image I added a few more test things to try out.  On both sides I put a light shading of red and blue to see if it would be possible to blend them once wet, and I also drew a quick leaf and colored it with some light and dark shades to see if I could get blending on that.  Basically I was trying to mimic effects one would be trying to achieve in a coloring book or drawing.  marco raffine 03

The bottom right image is right after I wetted the left side.  I did my best to blend the red and blue together, as well as the colors in the leaf.  Those items are still wet, but the penguin is already begun to dry and look a little different from when wet – a touch less blended and spread, and a bit more colored-pencil-y (if that makes any sense at all).

Finally the bottom right image is after everything had dried, for a full comparison.  I’ve included a solo pic of that image here, so it can be viewed larger:

marco raffine 04

So.  Do we really have “All the Answers”?  Did the blue and red blend?  Not really.  There was a bit of pigment bleed spreading the colors to one another, but no real blending of the two to become purple.  What they did do, was soften alongside each other.  In fact, that seems to be what all the colors did.  The pigments spread slightly, giving a bit more color to the background of the pencil strokes and softening the overall look of the colored image.  In real life the coloring looks very dry, almost pastel-y, and the pencil strokes are visible over the softened backgrounds.

I think the final answer is that they DO spread somewhat with water, but not completely nor efficiently to claim they would be an inexpensive comparable to true watercolor pencils.  What they DO do, is soften the pencil look.  I think they would be great used with stamps for cardmaking, where one can lightly shade the image then soften the pencil colors.  In knitting there’s a term called ‘fulling‘, where the yarn is plumped up and thickened while still retaining some stitch integrity (unlike complete felting), and that’s how I feel about adding water to these pencils; when wettened the color plumps and fills its space while still retaining the original lines and strokes.

TLDR: Do they watercolor?  No.  Does applying water slightly bleed and soften the colored pencils for a unique, almost delicate look?  Yes.

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If interested in either the colored pencils or book that I’ve talked about in this post, you can check them out here:
Marco Raffiné oil-based colored pencils
Kerby Rosanes’ imagimorphia
  • these are affiliate links.


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imagimorphia: Egyptian page coloring-in-progress

Boy it’s been a hot minute since I’ve posted last.  Back-to-back secret projects will do that, unfortunately, so I’m gonna try popping in with the little things I work on around the big ones, when they’re ones I can’t share.

I’ve already shown a few coloring books from my collection, but those who follow me on Instagram or Twitter will have seen pages from others here and there.  This is the one I’ve just started: the Egyptian-themed page from Kerby Rosanes’ imagimorphia, the sequel to his incredible animorphia (which I also own and have sadly neglected).

Photo 2016-08-23, 1 23 07 PM

Ignore the dark circle in the lower corner.  I forgot to take a pic of the page before beginning to color, so I had to photograph the smaller version from the hidden object answer key at the back of the book.

Photo 2016-08-23, 1 35 16 PM

I’ve been using my Marco Raffiné colored pencils for this one.  I have been using my fineliners a TON lately, and wasn’t sure if I’d enjoy going back to colored pencils.  Plus, this book has all double-sided pages, and I was worried the markers would bleed through.

Photo 2016-08-23, 6 54 17 PM

I did a little media test at the back of the book.  The first little dude was colored with Bic Mark-Its, the next with fluorescent Sargent Art gel markers, and the third with bronze Sharpie.  Fourth was the Marco Raffinés (I knew colored pencils wouldn’t show through but I wasn’t sure how they would take on the paper’s tooth.)  Also Marco Raffinés are oil-based cp and not wax-based like my other ones so I need to swatch those elsewhere sometime.  After the cp I have Stabilo 88 and Staedtler Triplus fineliners, then a Gelly Roll glitter pen, and finally a few assorted Gelly Roll and other-type metallic markers.  In the word box I tried out my Spectrum Noir alcohol markers even though I KNEW they’d bleed, and then I doodled a flower and word up above because that was in a white area on the reverse side and I wanted to see if anything would show through where there wasn’t a drawing.Photo 2016-08-23, 6 54 20 PM

I was so pleasantly surprised with this book!  Not only are there a crazy amount of pages, but almost nothing bled through.  I expected the alcohol markers so I ignored that, and since the Bics are alcohol-based as well I wasn’t surprised to see they’d also bled.  What really thrilled me is that none of the others did!  There’s a faint bit of ghosting from the fineliners but it’s mostly only visible in the white space area.  I think if I used them to color any image or sections that had a picture/patterning on the reverse, it wouldn’t even be noticeable.  Yay!

I was also really happy with how the Marco Raffinés took to the paper.  They don’t play nice at ALL with the paper of my swatch book (seen above, and again below), and it takes a lot of pressure to get any color to lay down.  In the book, however, I could apply the barest touch and get a sheer wash of color, and was able to layer nicely.  Double yay!

Photo 2016-08-23, 1 36 39 PM

PS I’m storing my pencils in a case I ordered off eBay.  I saw them in a review video that Peta (La-Artestino) did and picked up a few to try out.  The largest size (4-zippers) holds 72 pencils which fits the full set of Marco Raffinés perfectly.  (PS if you’re into coloring at all do check out Peta’s blog and her videos, she’s incredible!).  I keep an eraser and blending tortillon inside, along with a sheet of watercolor paper with numbered swatches of the different colors so I don’t have to bring my swatch book around with me.  I only wish there was some type of pencil-shaped sharpener so I could keep one inside too!

Photo 2016-08-23, 12 47 06 AM

Finally, here’s the coloring in progress, where I stopped at last night.  I started by lightly shading in the areas I wanted the darkest color, using my lighter blue and brown.  Then, starting with the head-piece and curved staff, so far, I went back in, applying a longer fade of each color, which I then darkened up in the shadows with a darker version of each color.

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If interested in some of the items I mentioned in this post, you can check them out below:
Kerby Rosanes’ imagimorphia coloring book
Marco Raffiné colored pencils
  • these are affiliate links.